Humidity, Blackberries, and Pierce Pettis

Ozarks heat, humidity, and a few fresh blackberries on the Lake Alma Trail helped heal my soul yesterday evening. While walking, I listened to several songs written by Pierce Pettis in the 1990s and was stuck that his lyrics are relevant today. “Everyday you see ’em / Live from the lap of luxury / It’s the lions of the colosseum / With politicians, millionaires / You won’t see Mother Teresa there.” 

Lions of the Colosseum

By Pierce Pettis

Upon this rock let us build our church
Said the lions of the colosseum
And as the Christians wander in
We can lock the doors and eat ’em
Drink the blood of the saints
Roll the poor for pocket change
Then on our knees we will give thanks
Said the lions of the colosseum

I saw Dorothy Day on the barricades
She was hanging with comrade Jesus
But the lions did not see a thing
They were rendering unto Caesar
Roman soldiers did their best
To silence those who would protest
They had a warrant out for Dorothy’s arrest
From the lions of the colosseum

In chains of ancient history
The church is a museum
Cobwebs hang like rosaries
Inside a mausoleum
Whose surfaces are clean and white
While inside rotting corpses lie
And so they like to keep the lid on tight
Those lions of the colosseum

Let us build a tower to the sky
And let it reach to heaven
We shall be as gods, we shall not die
And our reign shall be forever
So the lions built from age to age
Til they made a Babel of the faith
And tore the body in a thousand different ways
Like in the colosseum

Now on the satellite TV
Everyday you see ’em
Live from the lap of luxury
It’s the lions of the colosseum
With politicians, millionaires
You won’t see Mother Teresa there
Just the holy rollers with the manes of hair
Lions of the colosseum

But there’s rebel graffiti on the walls
Inside the colosseum
Down below in the catacombs
The defiant ones are meeting
Hiding in the underground
Blood brothers pass the cup around
And they pay no heed to the roaring sound
Of the lions of the colosseum

A little more Pierce Pettis along with his daughter, Grace, and Jonathan Kingham. I tend to like song writers who include coffee as a topic.

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View along the Lake Alma Trail

Chapters on Main, a Refuge for Learning

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My love for local bookstores was solidified during college when I worked at Adams Bookstore in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Mr. Adams was like a mentor to me during that time. I wrote about his influence during those crucial years in another post.

In 2016, I learned of a bookstore with character and good coffee right down the road in Van Buren. Walking into Chapters on Main is like stepping into a private refuge filled with books and the pleasant smell of coffee. You’ll often see young customers sipping coffee while exploring the shelves, using the wireless, or participating in book study groups. Marla Cantrell beautifully tells this bookstore’s story in Do South Magazine, The Best Chapter Yet.

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Young people enjoying coffee in the reading room

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I was pleased to do my first book signing at Chapters on Main, and they’ve continued to carry Five Star Trails: The Ozarks. It makes me proud to see my book in the company of other Arkansas authors in a locally owned bookstore that provides a wonderful learning hub for our community.

I have another book signing on Saturday, July 21, from 12:00-2:00 p.m. Ride the train, then pick up your guidebook and let’s talk about trails. Fall is just around the corner!


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The coffee shop is usually busy. I recommend the double shot espresso!

IMG_9034rrExcellent shopping is found all along the street next to Chapters on Main. The train depot and veterans park are located across the street.

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Train depot viewed from Chapters on Main

Continue reading

Little Taste of Tennessee

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Taylor taking in the view next to Falling Water River

On our first visit to my daughter and her husband’s new home in Cookeville, Tennessee, my son-in-law offered to take me on a short hike along Falling Water River.  I jumped at the chance, knowing the next day would be filled by a 500-mile drive back to the Ozarks.

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I liked the sound of the river’s name, and Taylor said waterfalls were on the menu. After a 20-minute drive, we were walking along the river’s edge wading out on the pitted Mississippian limestone shore.

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A “smaller” set of falls located upriver from Big Falls

The water flow was greater than I anticipated on this popular stretch of river. Several waterfalls were formed as the main riverbed eroded and fell away over time.

The trail comes to Big Falls Overlook before switching back down to the upper deck of Big Falls. Metal stairs leading to the base of the falls were closed due to past flood damage. My only regret on this beautiful day was that we didn’t have more time to explore. 

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Two of many hikers next to “Big Falls” on this sunny day.

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The appropriately named “Big Falls” where a powerhouse was once located down below.

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Fern growing in the moist rocky bluffs above the river.

Here’s a link to the Burgess Falls State Park Brochure

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One lost “soul” along the trail.

Arkansas Master Naturalists Learning Paths

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A leashed Hiker-dog on a kid-friendly hike.

Arkansas Master Naturalists participated in the June 2 National Trails Day, so members led several hikes around the state and shared their love of the environment.

I participated by leading a kid-friendly hike on part of the Shepherds Spring Loop Trail at Lake Fort Smith State Park. With the heat, a short out-and-back hike was the best option and made it a fun outing for folks at all experience levels.

Becoming involved with Arkansas Master Naturalists placed me with a group of people who share a commitment to conserving and improving Arkansas’ environment and beauty. I’ve benefited from the expertise of members and look forward to continued learning. They are true to their mission of “providing education, outreach, and service” to benefit the natural environment of Arkansas.

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When I first got involved, I attended all the training possible and volunteered where I could, not completely understanding how my actions would lead to certification.

To help my understanding, I made graphic organizers to communicate the process of becoming a Certified Master Naturalist and the Continuing Education to maintain certification each year.

The first graphic shows the path from being a Naturalist in Training (NIT) to certification. It made me happy that the trainers decided to use this graphic as part of the Naturalists in Training materials. I appreciated Care Butler’s suggestions as I revised these to be as clear as possible.

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The graphic below shows the required Continuing Education and volunteer hour requirements to meet annual certification requirements. Read the pages from bottom to top to follow the sequence for becoming certified or continuing annual certification.

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If you enjoy the rich natural environments found in Arkansas, get involved with the Arkansas Master Naturalists. You’ll immediately be immersed in an exceptional group of like-minded folks where you can contribute according to your interests. Through learning and volunteering, you’ll positively impact the natural world in your own backyard, and have a lot of fun in the process!

WordPress Photo Challenge: Favorites

WordPress Photo Challenge: All-Time Favorites 

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Fireworks at Lake Alma

Sometimes a “favorite” photo is associated with my pleasure at getting the shot or some technical aspect as with the fireworks above or the waterfall below. The waterfall photo has been on a magazine cover and is on the back cover of my Ozarks guidebook.

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Shepherd Spring Waterfall

More often, a “favorite” photo is more about the experience or emotion I felt when capturing the image. The photos that follow provide anchors to memories.

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Breakfast at Wanda Lake (John Muir Trail)

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Selfie from the top of Mount Whitney

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Reflections from sunset over Lake Alma

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Ouachita Trail thru-hike 2018

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Ozark Highlands Trail thru-hike 2014

Is it a coincidence that the only two heart-shaped frost flowers I’ve ever seen were alongside my two Arkansas long trail thru-hikes? Even with all of the expansive views on these two trails, the frost flowers are significant anchors to my memories of these long treks.

Gratitude to Medical Professionals, Especially on the Hills!

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The end of a climb in the Richland Creek Wilderness Area

I mentioned in the preface of my Ozarks trail guide that medical advancements cause me to hike with a thankful heart, literally.

When I was 16, Dr. Henry Rogers, our family doctor, discovered the blood pressure between my arms and lower legs was different during a routine exam. He recommended some tests in Little Rock. The doctor there referred me to Houston for more tests.

I remember with fascination as doctors conducted a catheterization to inspect the valves and chambers of my heart. I was awake and could see the small tube as it moved through my heart.

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The next day, Dr. Denton Cooley and an entourage of interns, whispering in several languages, entered my room. He listened to my heart with his stethoscope, turned to my parents and said, “We’ll fix him up in the morning.” He was pleasant but moved on quickly.

The following morning he corrected the coarctation of my aorta, a routine surgery for him. Without this procedure, my life would probably have been cut short as a young adult.

Following a short time of recovery, I was able to ride my bike, play sports, march in the high school band, and years later, march through the Ozarks and other beautiful locations. I sent Dr. Cooley a thank you note when I completed my first 100-mile bicycle ride in the 1990s.

Recently I was overcome with a sense of gratitude while climbing a hill in the Ozarks. This led me to search for information about Denton Cooley who died at the age of 96 in 2016.  I discovered a couple of videos and his Heart Institute that I will link below.

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Seeing video clips of Dr. Cooley made it seem like yesterday that he said, “We’ll fix him in the morning.” He possessed confidence without arrogance, and I learned from the video that he cared greatly about his patients.

He also valued teaching and research, making sure that the Texas Heart Institute was a teaching institution. I learned that he played basketball in high school and college. As an adult, he played upright bass in a band called The Heartbeats.

Denton Cooley 3I feel fortunate that innovations Dr. Cooley was a part of benefited me personally and made much of what I’ve enjoyed for years possible. Dr. Cooley thought he was in the right place at the right time. I agree!

As an insecure teenager, I was bothered by the 7-inch scar on the left side of my rib cage. Today I’m thankful for that scar and the health that resulted from the skillful minds and hands of medical professionals. I’d like to give a word of thanks to Dr. Henry Rogers, Dr. Denton Cooley, and my current physician, Dr. Ron Schlabach, for helping me stay on the trails! 

Texas Heart Institute (THI), founded by world-renowned cardiovascular surgeon Dr. Denton A. Cooley in 1962

Video interview of Dr. Cooley from 1991 – This is one hour in length but filled with many lessons from his life and example.

Seven-minute video showing Dr. Cooley’s life history.

Five-minute video interview of Dr. Cooley three years prior to his death. This included several photos from developments over the years.

Denton Cooley’s obituary in the Washington Post, 2016

“Like Something the Lord Made” – the story of Vivian Thomas, lab technician for Dr. Alfred Blaylock. Dr. Cooley worked directly with Dr. Blaylock and Mr. Thomas during the time the procedure to correct blue baby syndrome was developed at John Hopkins Medical School.

WordPress Photo Challenge: Twisted Wood

WordPress Photo Challenge: Twisted 

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Twisted deadwood patterns reflect pure light in the thin air of the High Sierras. Straight lines are rare on the John Muir Trail, usually occurring only where humans have built signs or bridges.

IMG_3049IMG_3219Give me the tangled shapes of nature over the orderly lines of civilization!IMG_3198rrLike beautiful twisted wood, good trails and lives well lived rarely follow a straight path. 

Ouachita Trail Completed

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Crystal Prong

Bob and I walked the first 160 miles of the Ouachita (Wash’-i-taw) Trail before and after Christmas, so only the last 63 miles stood between us and completing our thru-hike. Several things occurred to keep us from getting back out there, but May 2-6 was finally determined to be the time.

The woods had changed greatly since we came off the trail at mile 160.  Now deep greens of spring limited views and warm humidity weighed in as part of the pack load.

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IMG_7962rrBy one mile into the hike, pollen was evident on my pants cuffs as I walked through thick foliage.

We passed a small broken crag, extra special because of the clear water flowing softly. I topped off my water and snapped a photo.

Later, we filled up for the night at Tom Thumb Spring. It was barely a trickle, so I dipped carefully using my cup.

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Watery crag

Wednesday night was spent on White Oak Mountain on a long ridge with many possible sites. We built no fires on this trip since the temperatures were warm, and we wanted to limit our impact. The evening meal was more delicious than I’d expected. A simple Knorr side dish with a dash of olive oil was gourmet surrounded by open woods after a good first day’s walk.

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I slept well in the cool winds and light rain that fell on and off through the night.

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Crystal Prong was the highlight of our second day hiking. It was more beautiful than I remembered. I did a wet crossing to cool my feet and give me a chance to take photos. The opening image on this post is upstream and the following photo is downstream.

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Downstream from Crystal Prong crossing

Flatside Pinnacle is always a treat, even with hazy skies in midday light. Strong winds make you concentrate while standing close to the edges. Contrasting greens of early spring popped far below.

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Our only planned stay in a shelter was the second night at Brown Creek Shelter. I walked 1/2-mile from the shelter to Brown Creek for water, and an approaching thunder began on my return walk. Hard rains and a wonderful, booming thunderstorm followed while we had supper inside the shelter.

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Good water was usually easy to find on the Ouachita at this time of year.

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Hiking along Maumelle River, we had the feeling of being in south Louisiana with cypress knees along the water’s edge. For the third night, Bob wisely selected a campsite on a high ridge over a spot where the river was flowing quickly, and mosquitoes were few.

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When we arrived at Hwy 10 and Lake Maumelle, we took a break at a roadside park. The remainder of the hike would roughly follow the lake’s north shoreline that we were viewing from the park.

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I caught myself thinking of Nimblewill Nomad and his Route 66 trek while walking a section of Hwy 10 just feet from passing vehicles. Drivers were courteous in giving us clearance as they passed.

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Reentry into the woods was just past the bridge and easy to miss from the highway. A pleasant walk in the woods characterized most of the remaining miles. The trail crossed several small levees that provided excellent footing. Some bordered small ponds and some stood alone making us wonder about their function.

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Completely dry insoles and shoes

We finally dried out completely on the last evening, camping well away from the trail. We attempted to follow the trail to Penny Campground but ended up on an old roadbed and stealth camped without leaving a trace.

Clear skies prompted me to leave the tarp hanging close by and use only the bivy to keep out the bugs. It was warm enough to make sleep a little difficult, but the miles traveled lured the body into a good night’s rest.

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Bivy sack zipped up for bug protection

I used my second teabag of the trip that evening and enjoyed sipping while walking and exploring the area.

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We got an early start and clipped along at a good pace on the last day, stopping only for water and a quick lunch. Approaching Pinnacle Mountain, we realized our thru-hike was almost complete. We passed our first hikers in five days around mile 119 and then saw several on the Base Trail around Pinnacle Mountain leading to the Visitor Center.

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We’d laughed earlier while talking about the obligatory group photos that take time away from walking. Still, we had to stop for a photo before completing our trip.

My oldest daughter was our shuttle, scheduled to meet us at the Visitor Center. She drove up two minutes after we arrived and we began the drive back to the Hwy 7 Trailhead followed by the trip back to Northwest Arkansas.

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Last mile marker just under a mile from the trailhead

I’d begun this 63-mile section with feelings of sadness, but the trail did its magic, leaving me physically tired but inwardly strengthened and peaceful. It also left me with memories of the beautiful Ouachita Mountains.

We had the added benefit of feeling a sense of accomplishment that we’d now completed the entire 223-mile Ouachita Trail from Talimena State Park in Oklahoma to Pinnacle Mountain State Park a few miles east of Little Rock, Arkansas.

Below are links to previous posts from our Ouachita Trail thru-hike. We experienced the trail in all types of conditions by contrasting December with May.

Ouachita Trails’s First 51 Miles at the Imperfect Time 

The Ouachita Trail: Just Add Water

Ouachita Trail: Just Add Ice 

Place in the World: Cathedrals, Natural and Manmade

WordPress Photo Challenge: Place in the World 

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The bluffs above Briar Branch

Rock bluffs and flowing water form the walls of my place in the world. These are the places where questions and imagination run free as I walk. In these natural cathedrals, the weights of sorrow lighten. My body finds strength and spirit healing.

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Small falls upstream from Marinoni Falls

Natural cathedrals stand in contrast to the manmade cathedrals of my youth, where my imagination wanted to thrive in the beauty but was sometimes thwarted by a legalistic hardness that seemed to demand an unquestioning faith.

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My childhood church

I’m still drawn to houses of worship in spite of inner conflicts and my observation that a good portion of meanness in the world justifies itself underneath religious trappings. I love the shapes, lights, and sounds. Is it possible that love and worship are reflected through our personal struggle to reconcile questions and doubts? Does a mindless faith merely show laziness and lack of respect for the holy, the creator?

These cathedrals, both natural and handmade, are my place in the world. They bring me comfort and challenge, a few answers, but mostly beautiful questions worthy of lifelong pursuit.

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Indian Rock House, Buffalo River

Read more about these natural cathedrals: Making Time for Marinoni

Indian Rock House Trail – Five Star Trails: The Ozarks by Jim Warnock

Ultralight Shakedown & Wonderful Walk

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Open woods on the east loop trail

To friends, I’ve said, “The older I get, the lighter my pack.” Over the last 20 years, I’ve gone from a very heavy backpack to much lighter backpack. I say “very heavy” because I never actually weighed it or the items inside back then. I’d guess 45-50 pounds because I remember hoisting it to my knee before lifting it to my shoulders in a second move. I also remember the smothered feeling I felt while breathing under its weight.

Moving to lighter loads has been a process over time. By the time we did the John Muir Trail in 2016, my pack was at 32-36 pounds. That included a 2-pound bear canister and food for up to nine days.

This week I tried my ultralight sleep system and shelter. I considered it a “shake-down” hike to prepare for the last 63 miles of the Ouachita Trail coming up soon. My loaded pack weighed 18 pounds with food and water. Base weight (without food and water) was 14 pounds. There’s no heaving this pack, just a smooth swing from the ground to the shoulders.  I’d love to shave off more and approach a 12-pound base weight. It might be easier to lose a couple of pounds in bodyweight. 

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Shores Lake White Rock Mountain Loop is one of my favorite routes and close to home. After dinner, Hiker-dog and I drove to the trailhead as the sun dropped low in the sky.

This treasured Bliss Spring that crosses the trail required that I pause for a photo, so Hiker-dog waited patiently.

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I love the waterfall that roars softly below in White Rock Creek close to mile 2 but knew a side hike down was out of the question in the fading light. This waterfall was one of my earliest pleasing waterfall photos. I thought about the time I spent there as I hiked past the spur trail.

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Waterfall on White Rock Mt. Creek from several years ago.

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White Rock Mt. Creek in fading light

As we approached White Rock Falls, I knew we were close to home for the night. I used a rock as a tripod and took the photo below before continuing across the creek to a campsite close to mile 3. I thought we might stealth camp away from the trail, but the undergrowth in this area changed my mind.

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Photo in fading light from a rock tripod

I sat up the tarp by headlamp. It went nicely since I didn’t have to avoid rocks on the site. This tarp is 7 ounces and durable, a far cry from the 5-pound tent I used 20 years ago. After feeding Hiker-dog on a nearby flat rock, I crawled under the quilt. Soon I felt the familiar weight of Hiker-dog curled up next to my feet. She slept soundly all night. I was distracted a few minutes by moonlight through the translucent tarp but then fell asleep in the cool air.

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The next morning we packed and began walking by headlamp. It was fun to see the sunrise as we walked. After a breakfast stop, we continued the loop clockwise. Where I most benefited from a lighter load was on the climb up the first couple of miles toward White Rock Mountain. Speaking of “lighter,” I failed to pack one so coffee was cold. Forgetting a lighter was an embarrassing oversight and reminded me it’s important to check that list before I leave home.

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Nice signs at junctions at White Rock Mt.

The loop trail follows a portion of the Ozark Highlands Trail (OHT) where you’ll see both blue and white blazes. When we reached the OHT mile marker 19, in earshot of Salt Fork Creek, we turned to the south and began the east side of the loop. A muted sun lit distant hillsides through the clouds, and we had several small rain showers as we walked along.

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Mayapples and Dwarf Crested Irises were prolific in many spots. We enjoyed pausing to enjoy the color and variety. With my light pack, I never felt the urge to take it off. Click on the wildflower images for plant names. Yes, I like Crested Irises a lot…

 

 

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Hiker-dog walking past one of many Dogwood trees

 

Hiker enjoyed taking a dip to cool off as temperatures rose to the mid-sixties. I filled a water bottle and carried it for the drive home. The next morning I enjoyed a cup of coffee at home from that creek water while planning another hike with my lighter backpack.