The Trails Provide, Published in Do South Magazine

Here’s a link to the story I wrote for Do South Magazine, one of my favorite regional magazines. Thanks for reading!

 

THE TRAILS PROVIDE

WORDS AND IMAGES: JIM WARNOCK

Published in Do South Magazine September, 2019

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“Oh my!” Kathy yelled with a panicked crack in her voice. Scott and Kathy were part of a group at mile sixty-four of the Ozark Highlands Trail when the unthinkable happened. The left sole of Kathy’s shoe came apart, bringing her to an abrupt halt. We huddled around like paramedics taping a wound…..

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Walking with a thankful heart and a few lyrics in my head

IMG_0566rrThis morning I walked with a thankful heart, a heart pumping blood through an aortic artery repaired by Denton Cooley when I was 16. At about the same time as that surgery, I read an article about the poetic elements in Sweet Baby James, by James Taylor.

The song stuck with me and has helped me walk many miles. I sing it softly to avoid disturbing the wildlife or personal embarrassment if another hiker approaches. The words never grow old and, in some ways, become more meaningful with time.

Here’s an excerpt.

Now the first of December was covered with snow
And so was the turnpike from Stockbridge to Boston
Though the Berkshires seemed dreamlike on account of that frosting
With ten miles behind me and ten thousand more to go

Goodnight all you moonlight ladies 
Rock-a-bye sweet baby James 
Deep greens and blues are the colors I choose
Won’t you let me go down in my dreams

There’s a song that they sing when they take to the highway
There’s a song that they sing when they take to the sea
There’s a song that they sing of their home in the sky
Maybe you can believe it if it helps you to sleep,
But singing works just fine for me

Whole Life Challenge Interview

Whole Life Challenge Emily Beers article

Emily Beers wrote a story based on our phone interview to share some the my lessons learned while doing Whole Life Challenge (WLC). WLC isn’t a diet plan but a customizable focus on seven important areas that helped you naturally change habits for positive impact.

Excerpt from the article by Emily Beers:

Despite these new habits being integrated into his life, Jim said he will continue signing up for Challenges, as it’s a great way to reinforce those habits and solidify them even further.

“It’s a good reminder. Even though those 7 Daily Habits [the Challenge teaches] are ingrained in my mind, doing the Challenge helps me stay in balance and pursue good health so I don’t get out of whack,” he said. “Like if I start losing motivation and I don’t want to exercise, being on the Challenge motivates me just enough to push me over the edge to work out.”

To read the article go to this link: Whole Life Challenge Allows Me to Remember What’s Important.

A recent lesson learned is that it’s good for me to sign up for a Whole Life Challenge in advance. Ever since I signed up for the September challenge, I’m more mindful of the habits I need for this challenge. I’m making better decisions simply because I know the challenge is coming up in the future.

Rocky Mountain High Part 3: Estes Park, Colorado

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Big Thompson River

Highway 34 roughly follows the Big Thompson River from Fort Collins to Estes Park. We enjoyed this beautiful drive and finally found a nice spot to pull off next to the river. I wanted to go wading but remembered the power of rivers whose source is snowmelt from surrounding mountains. I reconsidered and decided it would be embarrassing to be washed away by a river I didn’t even need to cross.

Estes Park is always a busy place in the summer. We wanted to explore downtown, but finding a parking spot would be challenging. We decided to pick up a few snacks at a grocery store and didn’t feel guilty walking to town when we left the store.

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We’re naturally attracted to independent stores, so Macdonald Bookshop was a treat. It opened in the Macdonald’s living room in 1928 and was operated by Jessica Macdonald until 1957. Paula Steige, a third-generation Macdonald, is the current owner.

IMG_5037rrI wanted to revisit a restaurant I’d enjoyed from a previous backpacking trip, so we stopped into Poppy’s Pizza & Grill for a light lunch. It was so good, we returned for dinner.

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One of our favorite stores carried custom games and puzzles. The owner was very entertaining, and his wife was a teacher like us, so we had some interesting conversations.

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Clouds lifted from the night before to open up views from far below.

We made two drives with some day hiking into Rocky Mountain National Park. Trail Ridge Road is a drive best done in the morning before the threat of thunderstorms becomes an issue. Both trips through were beautiful. On the second morning out, we were surprised that temperatures dipped down to 24 degrees.

IMG_5088rrWe noticed this Steller’s Jay on a stop early in the drive while still at lower elevations. We kept scanning the scenes for wildlife, but the only elk we saw were in downtown Estes Park.

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Trail Ridge Road at lower elevations

Amazing what a few hundred feet can mean! We enjoyed driving up through changing habitats and then above the tree line where snow was slowly melting.

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The Alpine Visitor Center (elevation 11,796 feet) was still closed when we were there in early July. Becca was a good sport and posed in front of the snowdrift showing part of the roof, reinforced with large timbers to withstand the high elevation conditions.

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This was a favorite photo taken close to Trail Ridge Road as we returned from an overlook and short visit with marmots. These little guys are built for the winter conditions. Don’t leave your pack sitting around unattended though. I’ve seen them make off with trail snacks. They’re bold.

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Our new marmot friend posing

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IMG_5281rrAfter a stop at the Continental divide, we descended into the Grand Lake area. It’s usually less crowded than Estes Park. The Visitor Center with its hiking trail is a great stop. I was pleased to see a Menasha Ridge Press guidebook and added a copy to my collection for future planning. Kim Lipker is a prolific author, and this is a great little book.

One of the great benefits from authoring Five Star Trails: The Ozarks has been making contact with other authors. Great resources for future travels!

We enjoyed the trail that begins at the Grand Lake Visitors Center parking lot. I’m pretty sure this is where Becca made the unauthorized collection of wildlife. I teased her about the importance of leaving things in the woods, especially when visiting a national park. She was pleased when I removed the Rocky Mountain Tick, her souvenir from our hike. It’s important to remove ticks as early as possible in case they’re carrying any tickborne diseases. Reading the list of possibilities will give you the heebie-jeebies.

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On this trip out west, we repeatedly felt the desire to explore more deeply and spend more time in every location. One of the best indicators of the value of a trip is if it leaves you wanting more. This trip definitely did that for us. We’ll be back!

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To read the earlier portions of our trip:
Rocky Mountain High Part 1: Mount Rushmore
Rocky Mountain High Part 2: Bozeman, Montana

Morgan Mountain Quick Trip: Beauty and a Leave No Trace Reminder

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Beginning

Hiker-dog and I needed a camping trip, something quick and close. We drove 40 miles and parked at Morgan Fields Trailhead as the sun was dropping low on Friday evening. We hiked the Ozark Highlands Trail west up Hare Mountain. After pausing at the campsite on top of the mountain, we started back down the mountain with memories of the many friends who’ve gathered around that fire ring each October over the years. 

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The view at mile 1 up Hare Mountain

Since the trail was dry, I gave Hiker-dog some water in my palm, and she licked it dry. It was easier going downhill and cooler, too. I knew to expect some downed trees and noted locations so the Ozark Highlands Trail Association chainsaw pros can cut them out before the October Hare Mountain Hike-In. A lot of maintenance happens in September in preparation for backpacker traffic through the fall, winter, and spring. If you hike in the summer, what we consider the off-season, expect more vegetation and a few downed trees. 

Lightening bugs sparkled and danced through the air. Hiker-dog got excited when she saw a trail sign in the distance. Before I got to the road, she was down the trail wanting to keep going. I said, “This way,” and she returned to the road. 

On the short road walk back to the truck, I turned off my headlamp thinking I’d walk in the dark. There wasn’t a moon yet, and after a few moments of pitch-black walking, I realize the light was necessary. When we arrived back at the truck, I looked up at a light-pollution-free star-filled sky.

After I popped up the camper top, Hiker-dog surprised me by jumping in. She curled up on the floor and sent me a side glance that said, “I’ll just sleep here for the night.” She was easy to coax into her crate at the door and was silent for the night as usual.

After checking for ticks, and finding a few still crawling, I began to think about the next day’s schedule. It was pretty simple. Rise early, do an out-and-back east to Herrods Creek, then get a turkey sandwich at Turner Bend Store.  

Night temperatures dipped into the mid-sixties. The 12-volt roof fan pulled cool air across the sleeping mats, so I slept well and even turned the fan off around midnight.

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Hiker-dog’s crate made a nice camp table.

We woke early and, after coffee and tasty breakfast, hit the trail by 6:00.

Anyone who’s hiked during the summer knows the pleasure that spiderwebs add to the experience. Several years ago, I started adopting a more zen-like view of spiderwebs and letting them wrap across my face with less frustration. I had plenty of “zen-like” practice on this hike. 

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Cool morning temperatures made for nice walking. Morning light adds beauty to the most ordinary scenes. 

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Rotting log in the morning light

I found myself noticing small things. A snail shell next to the trail caught my eye. Love the beautiful patterns of nature!

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For at least a mile, ox-eyes (false sunflower) were constant companions along the trail.

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I inspected these guys a little more closely to appreciate their beauty from all sides.

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Pretty from all sides!

The ox-eye and ironweed attracted butterflies. I enjoyed watching this one for a few seconds.

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After about three miles, we reached Harrods Creek, a dry crossing right now. Water pockets were up stream, and Hiker-dog found a good spot for a satisfying drink.

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Trail crossing at Harrods Creek

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On our way back to Morgan Fields Trailhead, I planned to pick up some trash we passed going in. I had a small plastic shopping bag, but wished for a bigger bag when I realized how much was there.

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From the looks of it, poor planning was the culprit. There was a lot of unnecessary packaging. The markings on a can of insect spray made me wonder if a bear had bitten into it. Hole patterns were similar on both sides.

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These weren’t Leave No Trace (LNT) folks! I think of the seven LNT principles as a pass/fail assessment. If you don’t follow just one principle, damage is done. What we saw here represented at least two principles:
#1 Plan Ahead and Prepare – NO
#3 Dispose of Waste Properly – NO

It’s sad to see trash left on the trail, but it feels good to leave the trail better than you find it. Hiker-dog seemed pleased with the clean spot we left behind. 

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I regret to report that we violated the fourth LNT principle (leave what you find) because we carried a few ticks out of the woods. Maybe we can be forgiven since they hitched a ride with us against our will.

Rocky Mountain High Part 2: Bozeman, Montana

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Drinking Horse Trail

The second part of our travels took us to Bozeman, Montana. We loved the low humidity and morning temperatures were glorious.

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Based on a recommendation, we stay at the Lewis & Clark Motel right on Main Street in Bozeman. It was being remodeled, but the rooms were comfortable, and we liked the location. We wished for more time to explore downtown but enjoyed visiting a couple of indie bookstores.  The Country Bookshelf was awesome. It was established in 1957 and was the type of store you could easily get lost in for hours. Vargo’s Jazz City and Books was also a fun store to visit. 

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Country Bookshelf

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I found a collection of short stories by Edward Abbey titled One Life at a Time, Please. The title alone is worth the book’s purchase price! 

IMG_4962rrBecca and I had a nice meal and made a souvenir of the glass coaster that included good advice for cowboys or anyone drinking from a creek.

We then enjoyed some Sweet Peaks Handcrafted Ice Cream before returning to the motel.

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I learned of the Drinking Horse Trail on the edge of Bozeman close to a fish hatchery. It climbed part of Drinking Horse Mountain and rewarded me with a view of downtown Bozeman and the surrounding countryside. 

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View of Bozeman from the Drinking Horse Trail

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Arrowleaf Balsamroot turning toward the sun 

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Arrowleaf Balsamroot were blooming, and temperatures rose quickly with the sun, but low humidity was a welcome feeling for this Arkansas hiker. I liked this trail so much I did it two mornings in a row rather than spending time driving to trails farther away. 

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First look at my new Four Wheel Pop-Up Camper

Part of the motivation for our out-west trip was to pick up a truck pop-up camper I’d ordered. By picking it up, we saved the delivery and installation charges. I also had the chance to see several other models of campers while waiting for the installation.

I was sure I’d like the Four Wheel Pop-Up Camper shell, but it exceeded my expectations and is getting frequent use. It’s easy to haul, lightweight, and perfectly functional without a lot of bells and whistles. Of course, you can fill it up with lots of extras, adding weight and cost, but I like the simple design of their shell model. 

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Four Wheel Truck Pop-Up Camper installation

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Steven Wilkerson with Four Wheel Pop-Up Campers after installation

We hated to leave Bozeman, but it was time to head toward the Rocky Mountain National Park. I’ll share that part of our trip in another post.

Rocky Mountain High Part 1 Mount Rushmore

Arkansas gets hot in June! Even the most enthusiastic consider June through August the offseason of backpacking. Hiker-dog and I attempt to stay in shape with early morning walks at Lake Alma. I struggled to find the word that describes how I feel about camping out this time of year in Arkansas. Abhorrent wins out, meaning “inspiring disgust and loathing.”

I approached my wife, Becca, with the idea of an out west road trip that wouldn’t involve camping but would give us the chance to get higher, dryer, and cooler.

Two backpacking locations from the past that I’ve wanted her to see were the Mount Rushmore and the Rocky Mountain National Park regions. Becca has always wanted to see Mount Rushmore, so that was an easy decision. Several years ago I visited Trail Ridge Road in Rocky Mountain National Park and vowed to return so Becca could experience 11,000 feet elevation, but we’ll include that in a second post later.

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Pony Express Station in Gothenburg, NE

I’ll not include every stop we made but taking a break to tour this Pony Express Station in Gothenburg, Nebraska was a treat. Found myself wishing we had more time to explore. We also stopped for a view of the North Platte River.

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Platte River

After experiencing a South Dakota afternoon thunderstorm and light hail, we drove through a portion of Custer State Park with plentiful views of bison.

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Beautiful lakes dot Custer State Park. As we neared Mount Rushmore, we were surprised to find President Washington silhouetted in the distance.

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President Washington in the upper right corner.

Eventually, we made it around to see the front of Mr. Washington and an impressive sight he was from the trail below.

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Becca’s photo of Mount Rushmore 

We enjoyed hearing a ranger talk in the studio where much of the preliminary work took place. Gutzon Borglum, a controversial figure, was the sculptor who directed the Mount Rushmore project from 1927 to 1941. His son, Lincoln, was assistant sculptor and took over the project when Gutzon died in 1941. Mount Rushmore was the brainchild of South Dakota state historian Doane Robinson, who hoped the sculpture would increase tourism into South Dakota.

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I’d say Mr. Robinson got his wish for more tourists! We visited the monument early in the day and were glad we did as the congestion increased by the time we left.

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Entrance to the viewing area.

Driving the mountains nearby is special because of the unique road switchbacks and tunnels. One tunnel famously frames Mount Rushmore presidents in the distance. We met another vehicle at this tunnel after taking this photo. All drivers were careful when approaching these one-lane passages.

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Mount Rushmore in the distance.

IMG_4797rrWe stayed in the nearby town of Custer and thoroughly enjoyed visiting shops and restaurants, especially Sage Creek Grille, where we had lunch, then returned for dinner the same day! That’s an endorsement.

There was more to explore than we could begin to enjoy with our limited time. We did make it to Custer State Park Visitors Center and did some walking around the beautiful surrounding areas, but Montana was calling so we hit the road. (to be continued in Rocky Mountain High Part 2) 

As we passed a trailhead outside of Custer, I just had to get a short leg-stretcher in. This 5-mile loop and many other trails in the area will have to remain on my to-do list for when I return!

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Beating the Heat in the Ozarks

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We needed an overnighter, and I wanted to give my Four Wheel Camper Raven Shell a trial run, so Hiker-dog and I headed to White Rock Mountain, the highest location close to home at 2,260 feet. I was encouraged to see the temperature reading on my dashboard go down from 90 to 82 during our drive up.

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When we arrived, we selected a site with the help of Jeff, one of the caretakers. He knew level would work best with the pop-up truck camper and was spot-on with site number 2.

IMG_5465rrAfter a quick camp set up, it was time to walk the loop trail as the sun went lower in the sky. We began by walking the eastern side, enjoying the shade and remembering earlier hikes when we first saw the stone well…or spring. Water was flowing several feet below.

I kept Hiker-dog on her leash the whole loop, and she handled it well though I noticed her looking longingly at movement she would have liked to pursue. 

Berries and blooms are benefits from warm weather hiking, but ticks are the downside. I picked some blackberries for snacks and then two ticks before they had time to attach to my legs.

Part of the reason for our hike was to give a new hiking stick some trail provenance before I passed it on to a friend for his years of service to our church. As part of his last sermon, Pastor Bob gave his hiking staff on to our new pastor as a symbol of the confidence he had in the younger pastor’s ability. His kind gesture impressed me, but I thought he needed a new staff, so I contacted Mike Park, an excellent carver and musician and asked him to do a stick for me. After receiving the new staff, Pastor Bob named it Elijah.

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Elijah’s first hike

It was a treat to sleep in the camper as the evening temperature came down to the upper 60s. The roof fan created a nice draft through the windows, and I realized this was going to be a useful rig in any but the hottest season. Hiker-dog slept in her crate next to the back of the truck and didn’t make a sound all night (one of her many good qualities). 

I woke to the sound of birdsongs. I realized the sun was coming up and sprang out of the camper and headed to the eastern side of the mountain with Hiker-dog. Breakfast would have to wait. We caught some views of sunrise and walked the trail for our morning exercise.

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IMG_5538rrThe morning light made Hiker-dog glow in the reddish morning sun as we took in the views from a shelter on the east side of the mountain. She was one happy dog, and so was I!

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I love backpacking, but on a trip where pack weight isn’t a concern, eggs and bacon are hard to beat. After breakfast with the morning’s beauty still fresh in our minds, we headed back home, rejuvenated by our quick summer camping trip.

Other favorites for summer hiking:
Mount Magazine, the high point of Arkansas at 2,753 feet.
Go west and get higher! New Mexico is a favorite state because it’s a shorter drive but any of the western states have jewels to explore during the summer. Even valley camping in New Mexico can easily be in the range of 5,000 feet and the dry air cools down quickly after sunset.

Please share your favorite summer backpacking, camping, or hiking locations. I’m always open to more options this time of year.

Legacy of Love and the Outdoors – Scott Crook

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Chally Sims, Scott, and Carolyn Crook, celebrating Pack Rat’s 40th year

“When I was 19 he gave me a chance to come and work for him. That changed my life and opened opportunities I would have most likely never have had. I’ll never forget his dry wit and work ethic. Farewell friend.” ~ Rick Spicer, Pack Rat Outdoor Center

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Rick Spicer, with Pack Rat Outdoor Center

Rick’s words of tribute were the kindest way I could have heard of Scott’s death. Rick is one of many excellent young people that Scott and Carolyn Crook employed over the years. Scott and Carolyn sold outdoor supplies from their garage in the early 70s and built it into a thriving business that has a positive impact on Fayetteville and Northwest Arkansas. On my many visits to the store, I learned that employees view working for Pack Rat Out Door Center as much more than a job. There’s a team mentality and those who work there have a passion for the outdoors, the environment, and low impact business practices. 

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Photo courtesy of Pack Rat

I first met Scott in 2001 while in a photography workshop taught by Tim Ernst. The class portion was at the Pack Rat, the most amazing outdoor store I had ever visited.  After a day of photography in the Ozarks, the soft-spoken Scott showed up in a sports car to pick up our slide film and race it back to Fayetteville, so we would have photos for analysis during our evening session.

A few years later, I got to know Scott and Carolyn as the sweet couple who brought supplies and made coffee for Ozark Highlands Trail Association (OHTA) meetings. I also noticed that whenever funds were needed for a project, Scott or Carolyn would quietly make a donation. When the OHTA needed leadership, Scott stepped up to fill in as president of the organization.

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Stone memorial for Dawna Robinson, one small example of Scott’s donations

During one of our visits, Scott mentioned that he had fond memories of building the Ozark Highlands Trail (OHT) west of Dockery Gap. That was my adopted section to maintain, so I often think of him when walking or checking those four miles. I can imagine him doing some of the original side-hilling as I walk along.

Scott and I also visited about our mutual love of the Grand Canyon. Later, when they were moving their store, I got a call from Carolyn to see if I would like a large geological map they had of “The Canyon.” She sent the map to me, and I used it in presentations with students and other hikers.

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Photo courtesy of Pack Rat

Several years ago, awards were presented to volunteers who were instrumental in the development and maintenance of the Ozark Highlands Trail. Scott and Carolyn Crook received an award for their commitment and many years of service.

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Scott and Carolyn receiving the Eagle Service Award from Boy Scouts of America

Nothing brings out someone’s strength like adversity. When Scott became ill with Parkinson’s Disease, his tenacity and dedication became all the more evident. He continued to attend OHTA meetings and would still speak up when wanting to put funding behind a project. Carolyn demonstrated amazing commitment as she assisted in his care and remained active in work and as a volunteer.

Scott was a quiet person, but I noticed that heads turned and eyes fixed on him if he spoke. When his speech was unclear due to Parkinson’s Disease, no one minded if it took a few seconds to understand what he was trying to say. As his illness progressed, he would often communicate his thought to Carolyn, and she would relay it to the group. I only saw portions of their lives, but they were a lifelong team and their love for each other, and the outdoors, was evident in everything they did.

Farewell to our wonderful friend.

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Photo courtesy of Pack Rat

Scott Crook’s Obituary

We are very sad to inform you that our founder and owner Scott W. Crook, 72, departed this world for his next adventure June 10, 2019 surrounded by loved ones and family.

Scott was born February 6, 1947 in Atlanta, Georgia to James and Mary Crook, who raised him, his brother and two sisters in an Air Force family moving all over the country.

Scott earned a degree in Chemistry from Centenary College in Shreveport, Louisiana, he moved to Fayetteville to pursue a post graduate degree in Organic Chemistry at the University of Arkansas, where he met and married the love of his life, Carolyn while she was pursuing post-doctoral research. They were married on September 30th, 1971.

He loved the outdoors and animals. Scott’s father started him fishing from the time he could hold a pole, and he pursued becoming an Eagle Scout to be outdoors as much as he could. Growing up, Scott’s family always had small pets, including flying squirrels. Carolyn and Scott have kept up the Crook tradition of keeping flying squirrels as pets to this day. Barney and Simon are both about 10 years old.

After a backpacking trip with some friends in Wyoming, Scott and Carolyn realized the nearest outdoor outfitting store was over two hours away in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Wanting to bring outdoor supplies closer to home, they opened Pack Rat Outdoor Center in 1973. Pack Rat is a Fayetteville icon and has become one of the most influential and philanthropic local business in the Northwest Arkansas region.

Scott was one of the original members of the Ozark Highlands Trail Association and with Carolyn, he remained committed to the outdoors with his involvement in the Southern Utah Wilderness Association, the Nature Conservancy of Arkansas, National Audubon Society, Trout Unlimited, the Sierra Club and a life-long member of the Ozark Society.

Scott made Northwest Arkansas and the world a better place through his passion and devotions to the outdoors. His contributions will be remembered and missed.

We need our indies! bookish: An indie shop for folks who read

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photo from Bookish website

It’s hip! It’s fun! But, there’s depth, too! Bookish is Fort Smith’s independent bookstore, owned and operated by a group of delightful ladies who are themselves, bookish through and through. As a bonus, they were excellent teachers, known for their ability to build strong relationships through the written word. Regardless of your interests, Jennifer, Sara, and Linda will help you find the right book or order it if it’s not on the shelves.

IMG_4385rrThis store has a fresh, modern look, but it’s welcoming and warm with comfortable nooks for reading and conversation.

Bookish is also buzzing with literary activities. They’ve hosted a writing workshop with Tipsy Mockingbird (a local publisher) and one of their writers, Kevin Johnson, acting as facilitators.  They also host monthly book clubs. They’ll probably do another writing workshop in the near future, so follow their social media and watch for details of upcoming events.

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Kevin Johnson, author, visits with store owners and representatives from a local publisher.

IMG_3878rrFull disclosure: Both River Valley independent bookstores, bookish, and Chapters on Main, carry my trail guidebook, but I’d still love them if they didn’t! We need them both! They serve a combined population of about 190,000 people in Crawford and Sebastian Counties and act as hubs for the literary lives of many residents.

Authentic snippets of life occur in independent bookstores where the soil is rich, varied, and porous, unlike large stores built from standard designs with the primary goal of increased sales.

On a single Saturday morning at bookish, I met a young man planning future adventures in the Ozarks. His love of nature inspired me to want to continue my explorations and writing. I saw a young mother smiling at her daughter’s fascination with new books. Nearby, a father read to his child while his wife browsed the shelves. On the other side of the store, a young couple looked through guidebooks for their next adventures to share.

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IMG_4401rrScenes like these are much more likely to occur at bookish than the big box stores. I’m thankful for this special place filled with great words and people from all walks of life who have a love for learning.

Some might think it’s a stretch, but I believe an independent bookstore might be thought of as a sacred space. Forrest Church said, “you might also choose to see it as a cathedral of the human spirit – a storehouse consecrated to the full spectrum of human experience.” Bookish is such a place!

bookish: An indie shop for folks who read
115 N. 10th St., Suite H-119-C,
Fort Smith, AR 72901
Phone: (479) 434-2917

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